Plants in beakers, genetically altered to try and improve their rates of photosynthesis

Hacking photosynthesis to improve agriculture. A delightful and illustrated introduction to compilers. The volcanos of the Antarctic. The Internet Archive has put up a huge collection of HyperCard projects, viewable in an online emulator. Luuuuunngs … innnnnnnn … spaaaaaaaaceHow big can a planet be? Gender-enforcement #1: A kid’s entertainer reflects on why parents won’t let their boys put “girly” stuff on their face. Gender-enforcement #2: Why won’t men work as health-care aides? Not only do they think it’s unmanly, but their wives do too. Yes, we should teach our kids to code: MORSE CODE, that is. Drive over a “non-Newtonian” speed bump slowly, and it’s soft; drive fast, and it’s hard.

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Scan of the cover of Galaxy magazine
Full-text scans of the sci-fi magazine Galaxy, courtesy the wonderful Internet Archive. The US government’s official page on how to prepare for a nuclear attack. A 17th-century “traveling library”. Behold tenyearsago.io, which shows you how various major sites — Amazon, CNN, the New York Times — looked, ten years ago from today. A human-to-elephant translation device. A machine that lays out dominos with precise spacing, for quick toppling. A history of the Sidekick, the best-designed mobile phone I ever owned. Using visual-recognition to play “Rock, Paper, Scissors” in your webcam.

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Picture of a Walmart in MadAllen, Texas, that has been turned into a huge library

When WalMart shut down in McAllen, the townspeople turned it into a mammoth, gorgeous library. “Pussy and Her Language”: an 1895 book on how to talk cats. (Via the superb Atlas Obscura!) The inner-ear mechanism that may lie behind some out-of-body experiences. An essay-length biography of Keats, who, TIL, was quite a brawler as a youth. “8 rabbits, aka 1 rabbyte“. How cheap paper led to the moral panic over 19th-century dime-store novels. A ghostly Russian radio station that has been broadcasting weird tones for three decades. (Also, as @BWJones pointed me to, there’s “The Conet Project”, online audio archives of shortwave “numbers stations”.) Writing a 2D game in Nim. The science behind recursive sadness. Goldfish survive frozen winters by producing alcohol. Via @gnat, here’s Wick, a cool tool for scripting interactive thingies.

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CGI model of what the first flower might have looked lke

A recreation of what the first flower might have looked like, 140 million years ago. A carbon-nanotube random-number generator. A comic strip about Lyft’s experiment in charging its employees to park at work. Why do porn sites have social-media “share” buttons? A cool list of coders’ side-projects. A guide to JOVIAL, a 60s-era embedded language the US military used for embedded systems. A hacker who has made a living, for twenty years, via exploits of the economics of online games. Quantum tunneling appears to not be instantaneous.

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An xray turned into a vinyl record, from the former USSR

Music-lovers in the USSR subverted censorship by turning old x-rays into vinyl-style albums. Which is better for communicating something, video or text? I have inadvertently created an A/B test on this. Why nature prefers hexagons. The Best of Byte, Vol. I, for free at the Internet Archive. A fascinating look at how to brute-force that math problem I posted about yesterday. omg I am going to buy this lighthouse and live in it and be a minor character from Myst (via Boing Boing). “There is a feral cat on the platform”: The NYC subway system experiments with extremely honest announcements. Once you hear about the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon, you’ll see it everywhere. How the “demo or die” ethos helped danah boyd. Kitchen sponges teem with some seriously bad-ass bacteria. The guy who invented crazy-letter-character-string passwords recants. Behold Fangle, a fun framework for quickly making interactive text on web sites. “Deepmoji”: Using emoji to help AI detect sarcasm.

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Image of an old National Enquirer article claiming that "Hackers can turn your home computer into a bomb"

“Hacker Madness”, a wonderful article from issue 8 of Limn magazine, devoted to “Hacks, Leaks, and Breaches.” The answer to this mathematical question turns out to be insanely interesting. Is a Sharknado actually possible? According to the Washington Post … “It could happen.” Some in-depth, on-the-scene reporting of a small-factory line employees getting used to their new workmates: Robots. Over at Boing Boing, Cory Doctorow notes some unexpected reasons why so many stories today are dystopic. Indians are spending less on salty and sugary snacks, and instead using the money to buy data on their mobiles. The engineers piloting the 1970s Voyager probes are still on the job, four decades later. Behold the New Optimists.

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Panel from an old comic book with a finger pressing the "hate ray" button

A surreal collection of hilarious panels from vintage comics. A proposal to make an emoji of an oyster with a pearl. An R2D2 translator. Speaking of which, here’s a budgie that makes R2D2 noises! A study finds that students who lose access to legal marijuana do better in school. (Here’s the original paper itself, entitled “‘High’ Achievers?”.) A small Vermont utility is embracing solar and battery storage. An algorithm that takes a sentence and finds a single word that sounds like like its average sound. Via @boingboing, a lovely typewriter from the 1950s for composing musical scores. Judged by historical mortality rates, nuclear is — by far and away — the safest form of energy. A cool-looking coffee table made from Ikea magazine holders, via Ikeahackers. The best bars in Brooklyn at which to code. Fourteen of Picasso’s self-portraits show the evolution of his style. QZ interviews me about the much-misunderstood Luddites.

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Photo of text of a joke about Windows

Coder humor. The number of cyclists in NYC who commute to work by bike has exploded, with over 46,000 now, almost 3X the total of ten years ago. German media ponders how to cover the inevitable slew of politically-motivated hacks/leaks in their upcoming election. Ethereum miners are leasing 747s to rush bulk purchases of GPUs to their mines. The rise and fall of Soundcloud. (A well-reported piece, but check out the hilarious correction appended at the end.) A bot that tweets a few random patent filings every day. Calculating the longest possible game of chess. (tl;dr: It’s 5,951 moves.)

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A dataviz of

A lovely animated dataviz of all the Citibike rides in NYC in one day. And hey, more Citibike dataviz: Tracking the progress of a single bike, and comparing how different demographics use the cycles. Pictures of women weaving magnetic-core memory for computers in the 1950s. Follow @trumphop, which shows what Trump tweeted on this day, in years past. The guy who made the amazing web-story 17776 explains his inspiration. A good Twitter thread of tech folks talking about how they unplug after work. Electric cars are moving to one-pedal control, and changing the rhythms of driving. How the erosion of job security produced “the quitting economy”. “Why I’m learning Perl 6.”

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Dataviz of which links are dead in the Million Dollar HomepageA study looks at the Million Dollar Homepage, and finds that “link rot” has set in: Of the 2,816 links, only 1,780 are still reachable. In China’s economic view, “Iran is at the center of everything.” Why do people Google words? “Echo Chambers In Investment Discussion Boards.” A study finds that people like analog pens for “drafting”, and digital pens for “crafting”. Yikes: RealDolls with AI “personalities”. “Brotters Common, Normannegg, Twettle Row”: @hondanhon trains a neural net on UK placenames, then generates new ones. At Mozilla’s “Common Voice” project, you can record yourself saying things to contribute to open-source voice-recognition. A report from the procrastination conference. Nintendo’s designers for Mario Kart ponder, but decide against, removing the Blue Shell. A brief history of the closet.

 

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