Category: Psychology

A Randall Munroe XKCD strip entitled "New Sports Created from Random Emoji"

After seeing this awesome XKCD strip, Julia Slige created a little script to generate “new sports from random emoji”. Behold Darkwire, a web site that generates on-the-fly encrypted chat-rooms. How people who are actually smart think, and talk, about themselves. Using a metaphor of waiters and wine to understand the huge new chip insecurity. Mining cryptocurrency in the dorm room. The Center for the Study of Existential Risk releases a video-game mod that simulates the rise of killer AI. It turns out that humans might be immune to the protein that allows for CRISPR genome editing. Cool: Listly.io is a tool that scrapes web sites and puts their content into a spreadsheet. More ridiculously great news about the plunging cost of renewable energy. Why it’s so hard to predict the size of a dump of snowfall. And my latest Boing Boing posts: i) How the American healthcare resembles a post-apocalyptic landscape, ii) an eight-year-old boy discovers data suggesting that wild pigs mourn their dead, and iii) how to preserve a snowflake for decades.

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A illustration of NASA's proposed Dragonfly quadracopter exploring Titan, Saturn's moon

A new NASA project would land a quadracopter on Titan, Saturn’s biggest moon. A fidget spinner turned into a brushless motor. “Enjoy screens. Not too much. Mostly with others.” “Fifteen Minutes of Unwanted Fame”, an analysis of doxing. An acoustic analysis finds that Botswana appears to have the most unique music in the world. What it’s like adopting an electric bike as your main mode of transport. A study finds that people who know more about how journalism is produced are less likely to believe in conspiracy theories. A piece in praise of American infrastructure. “Hidden camera captures rare pig thought extinct” is a pretty great headline. D’Arcy Thompson’s Victorian quest to answer the question, “are all fish the same shape if you stretch them?”

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Hacking a Furby Connect. Meet the men who are convinced we live in a simulation. Smartphone keyboards designed specifically for coding, Android and iOS. An online tool that translates a MIDI file into JSON; very useful for a project I’m currently working on. How video games harness the Zeigarnik Effect. Belgium’s aesthetically gorgeous telegram service is finally shutting down. “Aerial transit will be accomplished because the air is a solid if you hit it hard enough”: The final sentence from the 1894 book The Problem of Manflight. It turns out that “Classic Nintendo Games are (NP-)Hard”. We’re getting closer to cracking the secret of how porpoise sonar works. Google’s new voice-synthesis is unsettlingly lifelike.

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A screenshot of an anime show, with people waiting at a bus stop beneath power lines

Why are there so many shots of power lines in anime? I confess I’m probably going to blow money on this heat-regulating coffee mug. Why shame doesn’t scale. When we participate in surveys, we may overstate our negative feelings. Frankenstein was published in a small anonymous edition of 500 copies; it became famous because of theatrical adaptations a few years later. A self-propelled nose-wheel for airplanes could dramatically reduce their energy use while taxiing. “I Pretended To Be Emily Dickinson on an Online Dating Site.” A 2,000-year-old twenty-sided die. My old piece on “how to tell when a robot has written you a letter” — inside the world of automated generation of pen-written letters. Behold Radio.garden, a fun globe you can spin and tune into live radio broadcasts from around the world. How to build a new internet.

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"La Liberté Triomphante", a 1792 illustration from the French revolution, showing Liberty brandishing a thunderbolt in one hand and a Phrygian cap on a stick in the other

Why the French revolution adopted the lightning bolt as the symbol for “the will of the people”. How to tell if you’re a jerk. “Scurryfunge,” “mogshade”, “popple”, and 363 other English words that we have sadly stopped using. Science has determined you can drink as much damn coffee as you like. The use of “meritocracy” soared from its invention in 1958 until today, except for a big dip in the 80s. Meet the New York Times“super commenters”. Why China is building the world’s hugest dish to look for extraterrestrial life. The last people in the US still using iron lungs. A Javascript punch-card emulator. Tearing a book apart and reassembling it, letter by letter: A gorgeous art project!

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Photos of hurricane clouds, from US government fly-throughs

Photos of hurricane clouds, taken by government fly-throughs. The “Knight TouchBar 2000”, an implementation of KITT’s chaser hood-animation on the Macbook TouchBar. Our corner of the universe increasingly appears to be “weird”, and possibly unrepresentative of the rest of reality. “Empathy produces data on what it is like to be other people.” A history of the idea of Purgatory. Bird feeders appear to be creating evolutionary pressure that makes bird-beaks longer. Tim Carmody on the experience of time in Dante’s Inferno, and how it relates to our last Trumpian year. Debugging a program by listening to the PCM data-dump in Audacity, to locate the memory leak. Contented hippos. What actual government policies could respond to mass-employment-by-automation? “Edgar Allan Poe is dead … but few will be grieved by it.”: A positively brutal obituary.

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Screenshot of "woebot", a chatbot therapist on Facebook Messenger

Behold “Woebot”, a therapist chatbot that lives on Facebook Messenger. (It does cognitive behavioral therapy.) Twenty years after a prankster put a pumpkin atop Cornell’s McGraw Tower, we still don’t know who did it, or how. The story behind the paperclip-apocalypse game. Behold the online mattress-review wars. Why background chatter in your office distracts you, but not the chatter in cafes. Meet the highest US judge who’s been coding for decades — in BASIC. Patriotic stress balls. What the US would look like divided into concentric rings of equal population. Can fish get depressed? Creating about 40 times the weight of the Earth in gold: When neutron stars collide. Jeremy, “the lefty snail”, is dead. Moo: The programming language “COW” has been implemented in Javascript.

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Photo of a whale tail emerging from the water
This year’s winners of Scuba Diving Magazine‘s photography contest.
“Are Inventions Inevitable?” A parrot that orders stuff using Alexa, by imitating its owner’s voice. I’ve been digging surfing the web using w3m, an old-school all-text browser; here’s how to instal it on a Mac. Hey, they’ve found two new deep-sea crustacean species! (“Two eyeless species of millimetric proportions,” to be precise.) Ur-drone-photography: A 1920 book on taking photos from biplanes. Here’s “The Coming Software Apocalypse“, a good long piece about how to manage increasingly complex code bases. What do you call a city of octopuses? A Stanford psychologist on the art of dealing with assholes. A wonderful tale of hunting a strange, gnarly software bug.

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Historical description of a region, from 1916, written in emoji
A text written using emoji, in 1916. (Courtesy @GlennF!) Why the Mind has a Body: The view from 1903. “Generational clichés are the ultimate zombie idea, easy to refute but impossible to kill.” How mushrooms could create self-healing concrete. How do you herd cattle in flooded Texas? With a helicopter. Comparing the lives of janitors at high-tech firms, one in 1980 and one today. Of fidget spinners and the challenges of modern “fad management”. When merely reporting on hate speech can get you algorithmically banned from Google’s ad network. “Clapping”, on Medium, is quantum. On the ecological biodiversity of Toronto’s urban ravines. An awesome cartoon description of Firefox’s new CSS engine. Young Americans are more likely to read their news than to watch it; older Americans are the reverse. The literary style of Zork.

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After encountering this wonderful factoid, my twitter followers began offering some other fun translations for “computer”: In Chinese it’s “electric brain”, in Spanish it translates as “sorter”, and another way to render the Icelandic version? “Prophetess of numbers.” Oh, and consider “ikiaqqivik”, the Inuit word for “Internet”, which translates as “traveling through layers.” In other linkstuff: A supernova so huge it takes out a nearby giant star. Using smilies at work “may decrease perceptions of competence”. “Icebox” is a Chrome extension that fights impulse-purchasing by replacing the “buy” button on e-commerce sites, and imposing a purchase delay. A paper computer from 1958.

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